Living with Toxic Relatives

Anyone who’s come out of a long-term toxic relationship knows that a manipulative, vindictive ex can all but ruin your life. They’ll at least do their best to try. My husband’s abuser managed to sabotage his career, basically setting him back to square one. She did this even though taking away his means to support himself also meant taking away his means to pay child support to her. An emotionally healthy woman with a handful of kids will look for a job to help support herself and her children. An unbalanced wreck in the same situation will spend all of her time plotting and scheming until she succeeds in cutting off the only source of income she does have.

To me, this is one of the most baffling aspects of psychopaths and the personality disordered. When they perceive that someone has wronged them, they will go out of their way to harm that person, even when it is inevitable that they themselves will be negatively affected by the outcome. I truly believe that many of them do have the foresight to understand that they will suffer consequences for their own actions, but they go ahead and implement whatever malicious plot they’ve devised, because they so badly want to cause someone else’s suffering.

My husband was in the military, and we were living all the way across the country from ex-BPD when she strategically tried to destroy his life. (In hindsight, the distance was the biggest blessing). We packed up and temporarily moved in with one of his relatives who lives in between our home state and the one we had just moved from. My hubby had a job prospect in the area; it didn’t pan out, we wound up staying with the relative and her family longer than we had planned, and she turned out to be highly manipulative which made an already stressful situation almost unbearable.

My husband eventually landed the job that he would have for the next several years, and we got our own place. He was quickly promoted to a management position, and eventually I was hired on with the company too. The owners turned out to be the most heinous, emotionally manipulative, abusive people either of us has ever worked for, and maybe I’ll get into that some other time. Eventually, this company wanted him to move back to our home state, and they promised him a promotion. He never got it, the work became intermittent, and we wound up staying with his parents for much longer than expected.

The idea was to move in with them for several months while my husband set up his surgery (to correct an injury and improve mobility), recover from the surgery, and give us time to search for a rental property. However, The Universe rarely takes our plans into account, and things got crazy almost as soon as we arrived back home.

Which brings me to the reason I started writing this post. I recently wrote a flash fiction piece that was inspired by our stay with the in-laws, and I figured why not supplement it with a blog post summarizing what really happened. I’ve started reading back through my journal entries and will post soon.

Getting Back Into Blogging

When I first created this blog, I intended to chronologically recount my story of abuse. There are a few reasons the blog has remained stagnant for so long. One, my brain works in a more random way, not so much chronological. At this point, I’m thinking of writing a book (or two or three), that way I can keep adding events to the correct chapters as I remember them.

Two, and this is more of an excuse than anything else, is life happened. I got busy with work and other things. Because I already felt overwhelmed at trying to recount my tale, it was easy to use “I’m just too busy” as an excuse to avoid writing about what I’d been through.

Three, and probably most importantly, is that I realized shortly after I created my blog that my significant other (now my husband) had been through the same thing I had but to a far worse degree. At the time, he was still in touch with his abuser who was actively trying to destroy his life. This was causing all kinds of problems, and it was what I really wanted to document because it caused me so much more pain than actually living with a psychopath ever did.

Getting back to feeling overwhelmed, my situation was confusing, I didn’t have the terminology to adequately express everything that was happening, and trying to figure out what exactly was going on was exhausting. Eventually, my husband and I figured everything (mostly) out, but it was still difficult to comprehend. I feel even more compelled to try to get this out, if for no other reason than there doesn’t seem to be much information out there on how to cope with this type of situation, and how to help a loved one who is dealing with CPTSD and dissociation while they are actively being abused. It was a frustrating, frightening experience, and I can’t be the only person to have gone through this with someone dear, not knowing how to help. In fact, some of my reactions probably made it worse.

My goal is to write a book in two parts (possibly three). The first book will relay the story of the part of my life I lived with my narcissistic abuser; the second book will recount the journey my husband and I have taken through the aftermath of abuse. A possible third book would be my husband’s life with his borderline personality disordered abuser, but that’s completely up to him. I know a good deal of that story, but it’s his to tell.

In the meantime, where am I going with the blog? Unfortunately, my husband and I have both lived with, and worked with, some extremely volatile and manipulative people, even after we thought we’d be free of those types for good. Writing about these experiences seems like an easier jumping off point while I’m working on my first book.

Welcome to My Dysfunctional Family

As we start the new year, I was reflecting on my goals for 2019, and that got me thinking about how much can happen in a year. A few years ago, my husband and I started a tradition of writing down Happy Thoughts throughout the year and stuffing them into a jar, then we read them to each other during the first few days of the new year. We’ve been doing that this week, and I’m realizing how much I have to be grateful for, and I don’t want to take anything for granted.

I grew up in a dysfunctional family, so it’s amazing that it took me as long as it did to recognize it when I found myself entrapped in it in my adult life. What’s more puzzling is that, even after my own experience, I didn’t see my best friend’s (now my husband) Stockholm Syndrome for what it was. In my defense, I was still licking my wounds and trying to make sense of what I had been through. I was also blinded by optimism and a renewed sense of hope.

So many people feel obligated to maintain unhealthy relationships because of a little shared DNA, and I’ll never completely understand that. I left my abuser, and I had no trouble disengaging from my narcissistic father. (I came to see both of them for what they were at roughly the same time). DNA? That’s superficial. Toxic is toxic, and I refuse to feel obligated to enable a narcissist or to stress myself out.

As of this writing, I haven’t spoken to my father in almost ten years (same for the narcopath I lived with at that time; it was a clean break, no further communication), and it hasn’t been difficult at all. My husband went no-contact with his narcissistic mother a few years ago, and he doesn’t miss her either. I realize not everyone has an epiphany moment, or their toxic relative (or lover) does something so unforgivable to them, that trying to salvage the relationship is no longer an option, but I want to tell you that not having to deal with toxicity in your personal life on a regular basis is a much more peaceful way to exist.

Whether it’s a lover, a parent, sibling, or even a child, no one should have to¬†endure emotional, psychological, or physical abuse out of a sense of duty or obligation. It may be difficult, but you can remove the negativity from your life. You are good enough, and your needs are just as important as anyone else’s. You can have hope and aspirations. You can live up to your full potential.

5 Signs You Might Be Dating a Personality Disordered Individual

You’ve recently started dating someone new, and you’re caught up in the excitement of getting to know each other. But something’s not quite right. You can’t quite pinpoint what it is, you just know you feel a little smothered by this new person in your life, or perhaps they seem too good to be true. The following are five behavior traits to watch out for in the early stages (4 months or less) of a relationship. If you notice one or more of these, you may be dating a highly manipulative person, such as a psychopath or personality disordered individual (most commonly borderlines or narcissists). And, if your new lover displays all of these behaviors, especially after only a couple of dates, RUN!

  1. Self-Victimization – Nothing is ever the disordered individual’s fault, at least not as far as they are concerned. They’ve likely had a string of bad relationships, and it’s always their ex’s fault. When held accountable for their lies, emotional manipulations, and other abuse, they turn it around and play the victim. They accuse the person confronting them of being abusive, often while displaying the exact offenses they are accusing you of. For example, they will make overt threats and then tell you that you are threatening them.
  2. Lacks a Sense of Identity¬† – They may have a handful of likes and interests that remain the same through every friendship and romance. They’ve chosen these favorite movies, hobbies, songs, etc. to define their character and project it to those they interact with. For instance, a favorite book makes them seem more intellectual or a certain hobby makes them appear to be more talented. (Frequently, they only dabble in these things, and they can talk about them on a superficial level at best). However, if you notice that they seem to be into everything you are interested in and agree with every opinion you have, that’s a red flag. The personality disordered adapt their preferences, opinions, and beliefs based on who they are trying to impress at any given moment.
  3. Pushing for a Commitment – In reading stories from people who’ve gotten trapped in abusive relationships with these creatures, time and time again these phrases keep coming up, “whirlwind romance”, “we were married six months after we met”, “she moved in with me three months after our first date”, etc. That’s not healthy. Relationships develop naturally over a period of time; you cannot know someone for who they truly are after only a few days or weeks. It takes time to establish emotional intimacy, and it benefits you to find out whether or not a potential partner is someone you think you will still enjoy spending time with after the initial thrill has worn off.
  4. Clinging – They will try to take up every spare minute of your free time, and when that’s not possible, they will call, text, and message you to the point where you wonder how they could possibly be getting anything else done. They want to know what you are doing and who you are with at all times, and this doesn’t stop once the relationship is fully established. That’s because they very likely have a strong fear of abandonment, but even the ones who don’t will want to isolate you and control you. In the beginning of a relationship, they do this to keep you immersed in them; they don’t want you to be able to come up for air and have a chance to be introspective and realize that you’d be happier without them hounding you all the time.
  5. Insecurity/Jealousy – If you are spending time with anyone else but them, they perceive it as a stab in the back. Why would you want to spend time with anyone else, when they are so superior and wonderful? They also don’t want anyone pointing out their abhorrent behaviors, offering emotional support to you, or possibly suggesting that maybe your relationship is unhealthy. Worse, many of them are so delusional, they can’t handle it when they see you talking to someone who is attractive – a server, ticket attendant, valet, it doesn’t matter – and they will accuse you of flirting every time you interact with another man or woman in a perfunctory manner. You’ll probably find that they are even jealous of you. Your achievements and talents don’t support their delusion that they are better than you (and everyone else); they are incapable of feeling genuine happiness at your accomplishments. (The more pathological they are, the more likely they are to fake it though, at least in the very beginning).

If something feels off about the person you are dating, don’t ignore your instincts; take time to explore why your hackles are up and if there is any merit to it. The sooner you remove yourself from a potentially abusive situation, the easier it will be. Don’t wait until you share a lease or mortgage, furniture, bank accounts, or kids.